Working People, Fifth Edition: An Illustrated History of the Canadian Labour Movement by Desmond Morton

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Author
Desmond Morton
Publisher
Mcgill-Queens University Press
Date of release
Pages
432
ISBN
9780773533073
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
34

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Working People, Fifth Edition: An Illustrated History of the Canadian Labour Movement

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Book review

From the dock workers of Saint John in 1812 to teenage crews at McDonald's today, Canada's trade union movement has a long, exciting history. Working People tells the story of the men and women in the labour movement in Canada and their struggle for security, dignity, and influence in our society. Desmond Morton highlights the great events of labour history - the 1902 meeting that enabled international unions to dominate Canadian unionism for seventy years, the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919, and an obscure 1944 order-in-council that became the labour movement's charter of rights and freedoms. looks at new model unions that used their members' dues and savings to fight powerful employers. Working People explores the clash between idealists, who fought for socialism, industrial democracy, and equality for women and men, and the realists who wrestled with the human realities of self-interest, prejudice, and fear. Thompson, Helena Gutteridge, Lynn Williams, Huguette Plamondon, Mabel Marlowe, Madeleine Parent, and a hundred others whose struggle to reconcile idealism and reality shaped Canada more than they could ever know.


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